What is KYBELLA?

Kyobella

KYBELLA® is a prescription medicine used in adults to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe fat below the chin (submental fat), also called “double chin.”

It is not known if KYBELLA® is safe and effective for use outside of the submental area or in children less than 18 years of age.

Who should not receive KYBELLA®?

You should not receive KYBELLA® if you have an infection in the treatment area.

Before receiving KYBELLA®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: Have had or plan to have surgery on your face, neck, or chin; have had cosmetic treatments on your face, neck, or chin; have had or have medical conditions in or near the neck area; have had or have trouble swallowing; have bleeding problems; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if KYBELLA® will harm your unborn baby); are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed (it is not known if KYBELLA® passes into your breast milk; talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby if you receive KYBELLA®).

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take a medicine that prevents the clotting of your blood (antiplatelet or anticoagulant medicine).

What are the possible side effects of KYBELLA®?

KYBELLA® can cause serious side effects, including nerve injury in the jaw (which can cause an uneven smile or facial muscle weakness), or trouble swallowing.

The most common side effects of KYBELLA® include swelling, bruising, pain, numbness, redness, and areas of hardness in the treatment area.

These are not all of the possible side effects of KYBELLA®. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects.

 

About Xeomin

What is Xeomin?

Xeomin (incobotulinumtoxinA, also called botulinum toxin type A), is made from the bacteria that causes botulism. Botulinum toxin blocks nerve activity in the muscles, causing a temporary reduction in muscle activity.

Xeomin is used to treat cervical dystonia (severe spasms in the neck muscles) and certain eyemuscle conditions caused by nerve disorders. This includes uncontrolled blinking or spasm of the eyelids, and a condition in which the eyes do not point in the same direction.

Xeomin is also used to temporarily lessen the appearance of facial wrinkles (sometimes called “frown lines”) between the eyebrows.

Xeomin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about Xeomin

The botulinum toxin contained in Xeomin can spread to other body areas beyond where it was injected. This has caused serious life-threatening side effects in some people receiving botulism toxin injections, even for cosmetic purposes.

Call your doctor at once if you have a hoarse voice, drooping eyelids, vision problems, severe muscle weakness, loss of bladder control, or trouble breathing, talking, or swallowing. Some of these effects can occur up to several weeks after a Xeomin injection. Do not seek botulinum toxin injections from more than one medical professional at a time. If you switch healthcare providers, be sure to tell your new provider how long it has been since your last botulinum toxin injection.

Using Xeomin more often than prescribed will not make it more effective and may result in serious side effects.

You should not receive Xeomin if you are allergic to botulinum toxin, or if you have an infection, swelling, or muscle weakness in the area where the medicine will be injected.

Before receiving a Xeomin injection, tell your doctor if you have ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton syndrome, a breathing disorder, trouble swallowing, facial muscle weakness, a change in the appearance of your face, seizures, bleeding problems, heart disease, if you have had or will have surgery, or if you have ever received other botulinum toxin injections such as Botox, Dysport, or Myobloc.

The effects of a Xeomin injection are temporary. Your symptoms may return completely within 3 months after an injection. After repeat injections, it may take less and less time before your symptoms return, especially if your body develops antibodies to the botulinum toxin.

Before taking Xeomin

You should not receive Xeomin if you are allergic to botulinum toxin, or if you have an infection, swelling, or muscle weakness in the area where the medicine will be injected. Tell your doctor if you have ever had a side effect after receiving a botulinum toxin in the past.

To make sure Xeomin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or “Lou Gehrig’s disease”);
  • myasthenia gravis;
  • Lambert-Eaton syndrome;
  • a breathing disorder such as asthma or emphysema;
  • problems with swallowing;
  • facial muscle weakness (droopy eyelids, weak forehead, trouble raising your eyebrows);
  • a change in the normal appearance of your face;
  • a seizure disorder;
  • bleeding problems;
  • heart disease;
  • if you have had or will have surgery (especially on your face); or
  • if you have ever received other botulinum toxin injections such as Botox, Dysport, or Myobloc (especially in the last 4 months).

IncobotulinumtoxinA is made from human plasma (part of the blood) which may contain viruses and other infectious agents. Donated plasma is tested and treated to reduce the risk of it containing infectious agents, but there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Xeomin.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether botulinum toxin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using Xeomin. It is not known whether botulinum toxin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not receive Xeomin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How is Xeomin given?

Xeomin is injected into a muscle. A doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. Xeomin injections should be spaced at least 3 months apart.

Xeomin injections should be given only by a trained medical professional.

Your injection may be given into more than one area at a time, depending on the condition being treated.

While receiving Xeomin injections for an eye muscle conditions, you may need to use eye drops, ointment, a special contact lens or other device to protect the surface of your eye. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

It may take up to 7 days after injection before neck muscle spasm symptoms begin to improve.

The effects of a Xeomin injection are temporary. Your symptoms may return completely within 3 months after an injection. After repeat injections, it may take less and less time before your symptoms return, especially if your body develops antibodies to the botulinum toxin. Do not seek botulinum toxin injections from more than one medical professional at a time. If you switch healthcare providers, be sure to tell your new provider how long it has been since your last botulinum toxin injection.

Using Xeomin more often than prescribed will not make it more effective and may result in serious side effects.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since Xeomin has a temporary effect and is given at widely spaced intervals, missing a dose is not likely to be harmful.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may not appear right away, but can include severe muscle weakness, trouble swallowing, weak or shallow breathing, or loss of movement in any part of your body.

What should I avoid while taking Xeomin?

Xeomin may impair your vision or depth perception. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be able to see clearly.

Avoid going back to your normal physical activities too quickly after receiving an injection.

Xeomin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Xeomin: hives; difficulty breathing; feeling like you might pass out; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

The botulinum toxin contained in Xeomin can spread to other body areas beyond where it was injected. This has caused serious life-threatening side effects in some people receiving botulism toxin injections, even for cosmetic purposes.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects, some of which can occur up to several weeks after an injection:

  • trouble breathing, talking, or swallowing;
  • hoarse voice, drooping eyelids;
  •  double vision;
  • unusual or severe muscle weakness (especially in a body area that was not injected with the medication);
  • loss of strength, loss of bladder control
  • wheezing, tightness in your chest;
  • eye pain or irritation;
  • severe skin rash or itching; or
  • feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious Xeomin side effects may include:

  • neck pain
  • dry eyes
  • headache, tired feeling;
  • diarrhea;
  • eyelid swelling or bruising, blinking less than usual; or
  • pain, redness, or swelling where the injection was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

 

What other drugs will affect Xeomin?

Other medications such as cold or allergy medicine, muscle relaxers, sleeping pills, bronchodilators, bladder or urinary medicines, and irritable bowel medicines can increase some of the side effects of Xeomin. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medications.

Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with Xeomin, especially:

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); or
  • an injected antibiotic such as amikacin (Amikin), gentamicin (Garamycin), kanamycin (Kantrex), neomycin (Mycifradin, Neo-Fradin, Neo-Tab), paromomycin (Humatin, Paromycin), streptomycin, tobramycin (Nebcin, Tobi).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Xeomin. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Please contact MedRevive MedSpa 301-760-7603 or www.medrevive.com for a free consultation.

Find confidence with Belotero®

 

Belotero is a unique dermal filler approved by European regulators (CE mark) and the FDA that seamlessly integrates with your skin and adapts to your facial contours, therefore plumps and adds volume to your face. Find out how Belotero softens and smoothes lines and wrinkles so discreetly like no other filler.

 

  • Is Belotero permanent?

No. Over time, the HA in Belotero degrades naturally as your own HA would, giving you the freedom to decide if you want further youthful rejuvenation treatment in the future.

  • How long does Belotero last?

The effect will depend on the individual and the area that has been treated. In clinical studies 66% of patients continued to show a visible improvement 9 months after a single treatment2. Most clients opt for follow-up treatments after 6 to 12 months to maintain a fresh, youthful appearance.

  • How long does the treatment take?

You will have an initial consultation to discuss your needs and your medical suitability for treatment should be discussed. The procedure usually takes around 20 minutes.

  • How soon can I return to normal activities?

Some patients experience swelling or redness after injection which usually subsides soon after treatment. Some return to work immediately after treatment. As Belotero is applied by injection you may experience a slight bruise, but nothing that a little concealer can’t hide.

y concerns, or don’t want to take on the cost of routine Botox injections.

Some individuals may be considered poor candidates for Botox, such as those with very loose skin and soft tissue and bulging fat of the lower eyelid. Botox is not appropriate for the line that runs from the corner of the nose to the corner of the mouth. That line (the nasolabial fold) is better treated with a filler such as Juvederm. Also, small wrinkles in the middle of the cheek are not treatable with Botox, but may benefit from a topical resurfacing depending on how deep and how many lines are there.

Imagine a piece of paper that is folded back and forth many times, causing a crease to develop. Similarly, habitual use of facial muscles along with the decrease in skin volume and elasticity, causes wrinkles, fine lines or ‘creases’ in the face.

JUVÉDERM VOLUMA™ XC to add volume to the cheek area

juvederm

JUVÉDERM VOLUMA XC injectable gel is the first and only filler FDA-approved to instantly add volume to the cheek area. It gives you a subtle lift, helping to restore contour and a more youthful profile, for up to 2 years, in patients over the age of 21. It’s different than JUVÉDERM® XC and works on a different area of the face. JUVÉDERM® XC smoothes out moderate to severe wrinkles and folds around the nose and mouth, like parentheses. JUVÉDERM VOLUMA XC, however, adds volume to the cheek area.

What else should you know about JUVÉDERM VOLUMA XC?

  • First and only Hyaluronic Acid (HA) filler FDA-approved to instantly add volume to the cheek area, resulting in a subtle lift
  • Clinically proven to last up to 2 years with optimal treatment
  • JUVÉDERM VOLUMA XC is from the makers of the #1 family of fillers
  • After 24 hours, you should be able to resume your normal activities
  • Side effects are moderate and generally last 2 to 4 weeks. Common side effects include temporary reactions at the treatment site such as tenderness, swelling, firmness, lumps/bumps, bruising, pain, redness, discoloration, and itching.